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Does anyone still buy Pioneer or Sony receivers??

mcad64

Well-Known Member
#1
With the new 4K TV I realized in a hurry, oh shit my old Onkyo can't pass 4k. So I have to run HDMI from my cable box to receiver for 4k video and an optical cable from tv to receiver for sound? Does that sound right? So now that means I can't get the higher resolution audio format like dolby true HD or dts master audio, correct?
If so , then I guess I need some recommendations for a new receiver that has ARC and 5.1. It needs to be small as my av cabinet is not very deep.
Was looking at this one:
Pioneer VSX-534 5.2 Channel 4K Ultra HD AV Receiver

Sony STR-DH590
Thoughts? Suggestions?

Thanks,
Mike
 
Last edited:

Akula

Well-Known Member
#2
Those higher res audio formats won't be passed along optical cables, but then again, cable boxes usually won't support them anyway. Nor will most cable systems provide 4K content. Unless you have a source for 4K content (set top box, gaming system, blu-ray player), I'd probably not worry about it at all.

Edit to add: if the 4KTV is a smart TV (wouldn't surprise me, most are), you can probably stream 4K content direct to it. They still won't be likely to get you high-res audio formats (again, not many streaming services will involve them all that often), but it will solve the video issue.

But if you do...

I'd suggest also looking at accessories4less.com- a bunch of us have bought from there and been quite happy. If they ship to Canada you may be able to get a surprisingly good deal on a Marantz, Denon, or Yamaha unit.

But if you can't find something that will fit, those should get the job done.
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
#3
Those higher res audio formats won't be passed along optical cables, but then again, cable boxes usually won't support them anyway. Nor will most cable systems provide 4K content. Unless you have a source for 4K content (set top box, gaming system, blu-ray player), I'd probably not worry about it at all.

Edit to add: if the 4KTV is a smart TV (wouldn't surprise me, most are), you can probably stream 4K content direct to it. They still won't be likely to get you high-res audio formats (again, not many streaming services will involve them all that often), but it will solve the video issue.

But if you do...

I'd suggest also looking at accessories4less.com- a bunch of us have bought from there and been quite happy. If they ship to Canada you may be able to get a surprisingly good deal on a Marantz, Denon, or Yamaha unit.

But if you can't find something that will fit, those should get the job done.
As luck would have it my old onkyo tx-sr508 can do ARC. Not labelled on the back on any of the inputs but monitor out and receiver set to tv and bob's your uncle. Nice!! Sony picture ......really nice. If I can just figure out this Netflix calibrated thing I will be off to the races!!
Oh well..looks like only the A9G has Netflix calibrated mode. I have the ugly sister, the A8G
 
Last edited:

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
#4
I bought a refurbished Marantz from the previous model year and got an SR-6xxx for half price. I've bought a bunch of stuff from them and have had good experiences. I wouldn't buy Onkyo again though. Too many issues.
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
#5
I bought a refurbished Marantz from the previous model year and got an SR-6xxx for half price. I've bought a bunch of stuff from them and have had good experiences. I wouldn't buy Onkyo again though. Too many issues.
Unless I need to take this current Onkyo AVR out of the system to put in our condo I will probably just keep it (now that I can do ARC) mostly because of its diminutive size. Size really is an issue as our AV cabinet is NOT very deep. If I do need to move it then, size, that being depth, is a major issue when looking for a new AVR.
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
#6
BUMP
I ended up picking up the Sony STRDN 1080. While I am overall pleased with it, the FM reception leaves a LOT to be desired. Comes with a roughly 6 foot wire that plugs into the antenna plug thingy!! I think maybe if it was longer I could get it to my window and have better reception, but it isn't and I can't.
 

Akula

Well-Known Member
#7
It seems like radio reception (AM and FM) is a really low priority nowadays. Heck, AM capability itself is even something that's becoming harder to find- the little transistor type radios are not always including that anymore.

I'd say get a different antenna, but that's a weird plug. Usually there's spring clips or some kind of coax going on. You could get your hands on a thin gauge wire that's longer and just splice it to that too-short wire.
 

jomari

War Never Changes
Famous
#8
i have a pioneer nowadays, just upgraded to experience the whole atmos crap in the new place.

i also had the older sony model, i cant remember but i think it was one that didnt do hdmi passthrough, so i couldnt play movies without turning on the avr. it was a while ago, but i liked it. it sounded a bit thin, but this was before i could do EQ on it.

congratulations!
 

mzpro5

Well-Known Member
Famous
#13
I mostly want the FM to tune in to local college and university radio. The rest of it is generally pre-programed pap.
Not sure what you are using for streaming but try the TuneIn streaming app. I have it on my roku.

Not sure if it covers Canada but you may be able to get your favorite stations that way. I use it for all my "radio" listening.
 

Lone Stranger

Well-Known Member
#14
I know you all know about the antenna that comes with the receiver but I see many people's receivers/tuners set up incorrectly. That AM loop antenna supplied with the unit is almost always connected to the FM antenna connectors and the antenna itself is usually lying on the floor under the tuner somewhere. I actually have 75 ohm T-antennas connected to my clock radio, my kitchen table radio as well as one stereo receiver. Where I live, the reception is lousy as I live in a valley but my clock radio (a Boston Receptor) picks up a ton of radio stations.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
#15
I know you all know about the antenna that comes with the receiver but I see many people's receivers/tuners set up incorrectly. That AM loop antenna supplied with the unit is almost always connected to the FM antenna connectors and the antenna itself is usually lying on the floor under the tuner somewhere. I actually have 75 ohm T-antennas connected to my clock radio, my kitchen table radio as well as one stereo receiver. Where I live, the reception is lousy as I live in a valley but my clock radio (a Boston Receptor) picks up a ton of radio stations.

What is this “radio” you speak of?
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
#18
Not sure what you are using for streaming but try the TuneIn streaming app. I have it on my roku.

Not sure if it covers Canada but you may be able to get your favorite stations that way. I use it for all my "radio" listening.
Funny you mention TuneIn. I know the new TV and receiver both have Chromecast and google assistant built in , so I said to my google home mini, "Hey google play Fm9 on my living room speakers" Low and behold, my receiver turned on and google mini said "Alright, playing FM96 on TuneIn on living room speakers." So there is that!!
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
#19
I know you all know about the antenna that comes with the receiver but I see many people's receivers/tuners set up incorrectly. That AM loop antenna supplied with the unit is almost always connected to the FM antenna connectors and the antenna itself is usually lying on the floor under the tuner somewhere. I actually have 75 ohm T-antennas connected to my clock radio, my kitchen table radio as well as one stereo receiver. Where I live, the reception is lousy as I live in a valley but my clock radio (a Boston Receptor) picks up a ton of radio stations.
My receiver didn't even come with an AM loop antenna, or place to connect it on the receiver. This is the FM antenna:

I think the termination is called a JST or some such thing.
 

Flint

"Do you know who I am?"
Superstar
#20
I only use TuneIn or Amazon Echo to listen to local radio anymore. In the car I can play the radio and still get voice prompts from the phone's GPS, and Tunein will pause about 45 minutes of the broadcast, so if I turn off the car or whatever, i can continue the radio where it left off. Also, the sound quality is consistently superior to the actual radio broadcast with no dropouts. At hone, using my many Echo devices I can listen in every room, and the sound quality is always as good as can be achieved.
 
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