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Pull Tubes? *Pause*

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
Curious, what does one use for setting up wire run tubing so I can avoid future snags/dips/turns/drills and just do it once?
Regular 2" PVC or something?
 
Last edited:

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Conduit size and material depends on what kind of wiring and the environment they’re in. 2” is very large
PVC piping is fine or low voltage wiring or you can us proper electrical conduit which has more sweeping bends to avoid kinks. Regardless of what you use, a best-practice is to place at least one pull string in it to use to pull wire after installation.
 

CMonster

Well-Known Member
I used 3/4" Carlon low-voltage conduit (orange). 1" probably would've been better but I can't remember how large the opening was to the gang box - that may be a limiting factor. Anyway, Carlon makes boxes and connectors that all snap together easily. You'll want a pull-string that is twice as long as the conduit. You can run the pull-string through by tying about half a tissue to it and sticking it into one end of the conduit then running a vacuum cleaner at the other end - it'll suck it right through.
 

Randy

Well-Known Member
Famous
Both of them^^^ are right.

Cant underestimate the value of a pull string. And, if there is ever the possibility of needing to pull more wire then make sure you leave a pull string in the conduit with the wire.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
If you need to use the pull-string to pull more wire, simply tie a new one to the wire that’s being pulled through. Never be the a-hole who uses the last pull-string and doesn’t add a new one.
 

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
Excellent. The pull-string is a must.

Honestly, 3/4 to 1" is all? I'm worried that with a couple wires and then larger terminations (Cat5/6) it'll have trouble getting through.

Thanks
 

CMonster

Well-Known Member
Excellent. The pull-string is a must.

Honestly, 3/4 to 1" is all? I'm worried that with a couple wires and then larger terminations (Cat5/6) it'll have trouble getting through.

Thanks
For network cable, you have to run it through raw and terminate it yourself.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
For network cable, you have to run it through raw and terminate it yourself.
You should but you don’t “have“ to as long as the conduit is large enough. A trick is to wrap the connector in some sort of plastic to protect it, then use electrical tape to attach the protected connector to the pull string. Use the tape to taper the edges. In a really tight conduit use a lubricant on the tape.
 

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
You should but you don’t “have“ to as long as the conduit is large enough. A trick is to wrap the connector in some sort of plastic to protect it, then use electrical tape to attach the protected connector to the pull string. Use the tape to taper the edges. In a really tight conduit use a lubricant on the tape.
That's what she said.

Can we keep this...up?
 
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