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UHD Blu-Ray Rips

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
It looks like folks figured out how to rip UHD Blu-Rays, but the files are MASSIVE. The Hunger Games in UHD is 146GB. :shocked:
 

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
Nice...but, yeah. Until storage gets ALOT cheaper, no way I'm ripping UHDs.
Storage is decreasing in cost so fast that I am going to call you out on that in a few months when the price per TB is half what it was a year ago.
 

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
Tell that to my wallet.
I purchased 7 3TB HDDs @ $104/pp (on sale) a 4 or 5 months ago.
Right now they are $109...

Flash drive costs maybe...or SSDs.
 

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
I assumee those are specialty NAS hdds. General purpose 3TB drives are under $90.

But there are now 10TB magnetic hdds in general availability and the spinning media avg. cost per GB has declined this year by 19% already, according to Gartner.
 

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
You made me curious, so I did some speculation on the most ideal high capacity drives for a RAID-5 enabled NAS and came to find the lost cost per TB was to use the Seagate 8TB NAS drive which with three of them you'd be paying $48.75 per TB in a three drive array and have 16TB of capacity. If you used 5 drives it would be less, at $46.88 per TB. That's pretty friggin' cheap, man, especially when compared to what a RAID array with 24TB of capacity would have cost just two years ago. Wow!
 

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
A four disc RAID 5 array using 8TB drives will yield roughly 21.5TB of space after formatting. You can only use around 75% of that for storage though. That leaves you with around 16TB of actually usable space. The Seagate drives are $259. I prefer HGST drives, which are $275. That works out to $1100 for four drives, which is $68.75 per TB. That doesn't include the NAS or server to put them in. Storage ain't THAT cheap. Just ask the guy spending $50/mo on commercial Google Drive space because he ran out of room.
 

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
I don't understand your RAID math. My RAID5 array is utilized to full capcity regularly, then i archive which results in about 20% utilization.

Why can't you max out the 8TB drives?
 

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
I don't understand your RAID math. My RAID5 array is utilized to full capcity regularly, then i archive which results in about 20% utilization.

Why can't you max out the 8TB drives?
I believe the rule of thumb is 75-80% utilization otherwise slowdown/issues arise...or fear of breaking rules of thumb maybe.
 

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
I fill until I get warning from the IS, which is usually at 95%. Never had performance issues.

With the primary OS drive in windows or OSX, you need free space for virtual memory performance.
 

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
I don't understand your RAID math. My RAID5 array is utilized to full capcity regularly, then i archive which results in about 20% utilization.

Why can't you max out the 8TB drives?
My NAS starts to throw warnings around 75-80%. I've hit 90% a couple of times and performance definitely suffered. QNAP tech support told me that the system will become almost inoperable in the high 90s.

I'm using eight 4TB drives in RAID 6. If I could do it over, I would use two RAID 5 arrays to make upgrades easier. Eight 4TB drives in RAID 6 results in 21.5TB after formatting. I try to keep it under 18TB, which is still above the guideline for optimal performance. I extend my storage with an 8TB external hard drive, which I am willing to risk because all of my data is backed up online.

At some point, I am going to need to do a big expansion to local storage. My plan is to abandon consumer/small business NAS appliances in favor of a retired/refurbished commercial server with 16 hot swappable drive bays, four SAS controllers, two 2.9Ghz Xeon Hexacore CPUs and 96-128GB RAM. These boxes run about $500, but do need a few mods unless you want a machine that sounds vacuum cleaner running all the time. I also plan to acquire a used LTO 5 tape backup, which I am thinking about installing in a second identical server, along with an optical drive and 8 hot swappable drive bays. The third purchase would be a 10Gb switch and a home-brewed Router. Baby steps though. This is gonna get spendy.
 

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
I fill until I get warning from the IS, which is usually at 95%. Never had performance issues.

With the primary OS drive in windows or OSX, you need free space for virtual memory performance.
I'm nowhere near my limits. At this point I'm using 1.8 TB of 14TB available.
All I had to go on were the general practices and rules put together by the FreeNAS forum/community.
If I ever get near the limits, I guess I'll find out.

I suppose if I started ripping UHDs, I could get there pretty quickly...
 

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
When you have over 5500 episodes of television, roughly 26,000 songs at 320kbps, a few hundred DVD rips, a few hundred raw Blu-Ray rips and a couple hundred decent quality (10+ Mbps) Blu-Ray rips, space becomes an issue. I am still ripping discs and sourcing quality backup copies for my online licenses, so I'm expecting to add another thousand movies or so to the 900 I already have (note that I own legitimate copies of nearly all the movies on my server in one form or another).

A typical 1080p Blu-Ray remux (no added compression or transcoding) with lossless audio runs anywhere from 14-35 Mbps and takes up anywhere from 15-50GB. A top notch DVD rip runs around 4-5GB. TV episodes run anywhere from 2-7GB, but average 3-4GB for 1080p with DD5.1.
 
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