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Goodwins High End: listening room is WoW!

TitaniumTroy

Well-Known Member
#1
The pics of this listening room are very impressive to me anyway, do we have any members in Waltham MA area (near Boston) to drop in and give us a report? In the Ultraaudio link they mention that room is mosty reflective and uses a minimum of absorption, but I think you can figure that out from the pics. Of course if you buy some speakers from them, how disappointed are you going to be when you set them up at home compared to the sound at their store.

http://www.goodwinshighend.com/facility.htm

More pics: http://www.ultraaudio.com/opinion/20090301.htm
 

soundhound

Well-Known Member
#2
From the looks of the room, unless it has absorbers somewhere I can't see, all that those diffusers will accomplish will be to assure the reverb is smooth...i.e, it would make a great echo chamber. A room like that will make just about any speaker sound bigger than life.
 

PaulyT

Behind the Curtain
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Superstar
#3
Well they do say "We have treated the walls and ceiling with a novel configuration of deflective baffles and absorbtive sections."... And they sell Dynaudio and PSB among others, maybe they're not all bad. ;)
 

soundhound

Well-Known Member
#4
PaulyT said:
Well they do say "We have treated the walls and ceiling with a novel configuration of deflective baffles and absorbtive sections."... And they sell Dynaudio and PSB among others, maybe they're not all bad. ;)
It would have to be pretty novel indeed - I don't see how that room could be anything but way more live than just about any typical home living room.
 

TitaniumTroy

Well-Known Member
#6
At the bottom of the page this is mentioned, "it has adjustable acoustics—from quite reverberant for live recording to modestly live for listening to playback of recordings." Not to mention some kind of natural fiber carpet they throw out there on the floor. While the walls and ceiling or supposed to be isolated from the room. I still wonder about the hardwood over concrete floor.

Overall I would have to agree with SH though, that room looks so different than even any dedicated listening room, I have ever seen. Couldn't they they have at least thrown in some leather couches or something?

Poor Matt, THAT has got to hurt, But maybe in a good way too Matt :scared-yipes:
 

Botch

I.Y.A.A.Y.A.S!
Superstar
#7
I've read the autobiography of Bruce Sweiden, who was a recording engineer for a few minor acts like Duke Ellington and Michael Jackson; he spent a lot of time in his book describing setting up the recording room, and the mics, to have just the right reverberant/echo qualities.
Makes me wonder how much a perfect listening room can muck up a good original recording, or vice-versa... :think:
(throw in headphones and direct-to-desk recording and the possibilities become almost endless...)
 

malsackj

Well-Known Member
#8
http://www.acousticflooring.com/

here is a quick link on acoustic flooring. I agree with Botch on the issues of the recording or playback room. Some of the latest recordings that come from the home studio are a mic in a room and with very little room interaction. For the pop artist this may be great but as we have many clasical and jazz listners we know this would not work well because the music would loose some feeling.
 
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