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Is 1080p too much resolution

Discussion in 'Displays' started by MatthewB, Oct 23, 2010.

  1. MatthewB

    MatthewB Grandmaster Pimp Daddy Famous

    I was browsing Sears the other day and they had their displays playing Avatar (you know to make all their pics look great) and I noticed while the GF was shopping for lord knows what, that the movie played on 1080p looked way to sharp and clear. I mean everything. Things in the background, and things way off in the background looked too clear giving the movie an almost unrealistic view of how things should look.

    Don't get me wrong, I love calrity and the 1080p displays are nothing short of breathtaking, but as one who loves movies, I would find watching this movie unnerving and not for the fact that the movie blows monkey chunks, but because the clarity is too clear. I look at my very old Pioneer 1080i RPTV and when I watch movies (including Avatar) it has more of an image that I see in my local cinema. I can see all the benefits of having the ultimate in clear picture, but when it makes everything including things that should be out of focus look crystal clear it gives it a cartoony effect.

    Am I the only one who thinks this way. Granted I may just be jealous since I don't own a 1080p display yet, but boy was it wierd watching that and seeing how all the displays looked funny playing that movie.
     
  2. soundhound

    soundhound Well-Known Member

    I think its more to do with cinematic style. Depth of field is not exploited nearly as much as movies, say, in the 1940s and 50s with the result that everything is in sharp focus whether foreground or background. In the old analog TV days (when TVs had vacuum tubes), there were adjustments which reduced detail.
     
  3. Towen7

    Towen7 Well-Known Member Staff Member Moderator Famous

    It's possible that you were looking at a set with all of the artificial image enhancements on maximum.
     
  4. Yesfan70

    Yesfan70 I'm famous now bitches! vvvvv Famous

    I'm kinda right the opposite. I think (as far as sat and cable go) SD content looks really terrible compared to what I was watching on my old Pioneer analog TV. I know a lot of it has to do with the broadcaster and the TV's performance, but even the better looking SD channels (like ABC and ESPN) still isn't close. Fox in SD looks like a 20 year old VHS tape.


    I keep telling myself I'm just spoiled by HD, but I never complained before about picture quality before going to HD.
     
  5. walls

    walls Well-Known Member

    1080p IMHO is pretty much just a hype number until you break the 50" size range.

    My 42" 720p LCD in my family room looks stellar with BLU but of course it also looks stellar watching a 720p football game.

    Now I am wanting to upgrade my projector soon and I WILL want a 1080p unit......of course my screen is 106" so it will make a difference.

    As for things looking "artificial", well, you were watching AVATAR! :text-lol:
     
  6. Doghart

    Doghart Well-Known Member

    I'll bet a dozen doughnuts you were looking at an LED LCD with the Judder and Blur Reduction settings bumped up.


    [​IMG]

    D
     
  7. yromj

    yromj Well-Known Member

    :text-+1:

    That's exactly what I thought when I read the OP. What absolutely drives me crazy is when those "ultra-crisp" edges start to move and it looks like a strobe light is turned on. I can't stand that.

    John
     
  8. Zing

    Zing Retired Admin Famous

    :text-+1: :text-+1:
     
  9. Rope

    Rope Well-Known Member Famous

    WORD!

    Rope
     

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