• Welcome to The Audio Annex! If you have any trouble logging in or signing up, please contact 'admin - at - theaudioannex.com'. Enjoy!
  • HTTPS (secure web browser connection) has been enabled - just add "https://" to the start of the URL in your address bar, e.g. "https://theaudioannex.com/forum/"
  • Congratulations! If you're seeing this notice, it means you're connected to the new server. Go ahead and post as usual, enjoy!
  • I've just upgraded the forum software to Xenforo 2.0. Please let me know if you have any problems with it. I'm still working on installing styles... coming soon.

Anyone still buying movies/shows on Disc?

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
I haven't purchased a video disc in ages and I don't see myself doing it anytime in the future.

Does anyone here still buy BluRay or DVD discs? If you do, what percentage of your video watching is from disc?

Me? I rarely play a disc, maybe ten times a year, at best (certainly less than once a month). I cannot remember when I last purchased a disc.

I still my all my music on CD, but not video content.
 

Akula

Well-Known Member
Some. But when I buy a disc, it's usually because the Blu-Ray + DVD + Digital Copy is the same price or cheaper than JUST the digital copy. Then I end up doing most of my watching digitally.

I do think physical media is on its way out, for more than movies, even. I have an Xbox One, and while I don't have many games for it, not one was purchased on a physical disc.
 

CMonster

I still owe money to the money to the money I owe
With the jump to UHD and Atmos/DTS:X, I've made some recent purchases. We still occasionally use RedBox as well. I think we're at about a 50/50 split between discs and streaming.
 

mzpro5

Well-Known Member
Famous
I occasionally buy a movie on BluRay but buy them used from my local video rental place. Usually pay $10 for a popular title. Last ones I bought was Deadpool ad Star trek Beyond for $10/each. I use to average 4-6 titles a month (mostly from Amazon) but it has been a couple years since I did that.

Probably 25% of my viewing is from disc., usually a rental.
 

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
I only buy discs for the following reasons and I always rip them to my NAS.
1. I cannot get a UV/DMA copy. This is mostly concerts and foreign films.
2. It is cheaper to buy the disc and it comes with the license anyway.
3. It is the same price to buy the disc and it is a movie where I really want that lossless audio (rare).

We still buy some music on disc, though the biggest music buyer is my wife and she mostly buys from iTunes. We use a combination of Google Play Music, YouTube Music and Plex for most of our listening.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
I haven't bought a disc in a long time. I have rented a few but that's because I have a dedicated home theater and I realized that I wasn't getting much/any use of it because I don't expect streamed content to look great on a 110" screen.
 

The DirtMerchant

Well-Known Member
Any kids movies that are really enjoyed I buy Disc+Digital. The kids are all over Netflix, but alot of their favorites are not there.
Any deals (Black Friday had a lot of those action movies that I simply like to have for < $7) that make them cheap (Star Wars, Star Trek, Avengers, etc) will end up with me making purchases.
Most of our watching is done via streaming (or D*), but I do still enjoy popping in a disc from time to time. Especially favorites.
 

heeman

Well-Known Member
Famous
100% Blu Rays...........

Blu Ray . com is my number 1 choice. Some awesome deals, we rarely pay more then $9.99 but most of our purchases are under that.
 

AndySTL

Well-Known Member
I still buy them but not as many as I used to. Kids movies we try to buy the BD+DVD so we can watch BD on the projector and DVD in the car on road trips.

I will also occasionally rent via RedBox as well.
 

Randy

Well-Known Member
Famous
Rent occasionally but mostly PPV I was never really much of a purchaser anyway. My movie library was mostly by accident.
 

Xgm3

Active Member
I'm 100% digital with movies and music. If I buy a movie it's digital on Amazon and I subscribe to the yearly Amazon Prime music.
 

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
I haven't bought a disc in a long time. I have rented a few but that's because I have a dedicated home theater and I realized that I wasn't getting much/any use of it because I don't expect streamed content to look great on a 110" screen.
You would be surprised.
 

rammisframmis

Well-Known Member
Only for movies I really like and want the highest visual quality. No streaming can match the bandwidth of Blu-Ray, at least at the present time.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
You would be surprised.
I don't mean to sound like "that guy" but I didn't save for as long as I did and put as much effort into building my HT to settle on PQ, Non-lossless audio, and risk buffering taking me out of the moment when I can run to Redbox and get a disc for $2.
 

Flint

Dog Faced Pony Soldier
Superstar
I agree with you Tom. But for me it is audio I refuse to settle on. Video for new is like teasing a book, I just want the story at the lowest cost and simplest processes.
 

PaulyT

Behind the Curtain
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Superstar
I buy some blu-rays still, though not a lot compared to audio/CD purchases. Mostly stuff that's not easily available, and only things I think I might want to watch repeatedly, like kids movies (many Pixars), or the complete Indiana Jones set, which was our latest purchase.
 

Haywood

Well-Known Member
Famous
I don't mean to sound like "that guy" but I didn't save for as long as I did and put as much effort into building my HT to settle on PQ, Non-lossless audio, and risk buffering taking me out of the moment when I can run to Redbox and get a disc for $2.
It depends a lot on how fast and reliable your connection is. I sit ten feet from a high-end 75-inch 4K HDR display. The majority of the time, I cannot see any appreciable difference between Vudu HDX and Blu-Ray. On the rare occasion that I see a noticeable artifact (i.e. banding), it is usually attributable to a slower than normal connection speed. Fast connections require less compression and therefore provide a much better viewing experience. Buffering is extremely rare and usually a sign that something is direly wrong with something in my network. The lossy audio makes a bigger difference than any loss of video quality, but only on certain films. Those rare movies are on my exception list where I will actually bother to buy the Blu-Ray and make a 1:1 rip to my NAS.

I am a collector, not a renter, and I like the on demand experience. It is very cool to be able to browse the movie library with the remote and be able to play trailers when deciding what we want to watch. The big advantage of using Vudu is that I do not have to rip and store 1600+ movies. It costs $3-4 to store a lossless Blu-Ray rip once I buy the disc, but I can usually score a UV movie for $6-9. It is tremendously less expensive and way more convenient, so that wins out for me versus a very small incremental difference in quality. I ripped about 500 discs this summer when I was unemployed and it took me several months. I have no desire to do that again.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
It depends a lot on how fast and reliable your connection is. I sit ten feet from a high-end 75-inch 4K HDR display. The majority of the time, I cannot see any appreciable difference between Vudu HDX and Blu-Ray. On the rare occasion that I see a noticeable artifact (i.e. banding), it is usually attributable to a slower than normal connection speed. Fast connections require less compression and therefore provide a much better viewing experience. Buffering is extremely rare and usually a sign that something is direly wrong with something in my network. The lossy audio makes a bigger difference than any loss of video quality, but only on certain films. Those rare movies are on my exception list where I will actually bother to buy the Blu-Ray and make a 1:1 rip to my NAS.

I am a collector, not a renter, and I like the on demand experience. It is very cool to be able to browse the movie library with the remote and be able to play trailers when deciding what we want to watch. The big advantage of using Vudu is that I do not have to rip and store 1600+ movies. It costs $3-4 to store a lossless Blu-Ray rip once I buy the disc, but I can usually score a UV movie for $6-9. It is tremendously less expensive and way more convenient, so that wins out for me versus a very small incremental difference in quality. I ripped about 500 discs this summer when I was unemployed and it took me several months. I have no desire to do that again.
I'm also not a collector.
 
Top