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Blu-Ray wifi set up

Deerhunter

Well-Known Member
I am a bit on the lost side here. I mentioned I am going to get a blu-ray in the near future so I can use it to stream Netflix plus then I can take more advantage of my plasma TV.

He then started telling me about b/g/n for connection speed for a wireless router. Since I want it wireless. And i need a router that's b/g/n and the n is the fastest. In short its all Greek to me.

This is also a person who thinks Pioneer makes some of the best sounding speakers ever made. So I am not sure what to think of his advise for HT.
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
The salesman was referencing the speed of the wireless connection between the router and the player. There are 3 specs, each newer and faster than the previous. N is the newest/fastest spec. The max speeds are all thoretical because factors like distance and obstructions can affect the connection rate. Each spec is backward compatible so if you buy a device that is capable of N speeds it will work just fine with an N, G, or B router.

That said streaming HD video requires a lot of bandwidth so a G spec router may be needed.
 

mzpro5

Well-Known Member
Famous
Towen7 said:
The salesman was referencing the speed of the wireless connection between the router and the player. There are 3 specs, each newer and faster than the previous. N is the newest/fastest spec. The max speeds are all thoretical because factors like distance and obstructions can affect the connection rate. Each spec is backward compatible so if you buy a device that is capable of N speeds it will work just fine with an N, G, or B router.

That said streaming HD video requires a lot of bandwidth so a G spec router may be needed.
I'm using a Cisco Valet router and have no problems streaming what is labeled as "HD content". Of course it is all what you define as "HD".
 

PaulyT

Behind the Curtain
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Superstar
These days I would say just get an N router; as T7 says, it'll work with B/G as well, but will be set for other new N devices you may get in the future.

If you have real connection problems even with G (though I'm guessing you'll be ok), you can get an N bridge (assuming you get the N router), and use a wire from the bridge to the player. This is how I have my home office set up, because the G connection to my laptop and the squeezebox is not too reliable from the opposite end of my house; the N bridge works much better.
 

Rope

Well-Known Member
Famous
I employ a Linksys E2000 N series dual band router. I'm running, ROKU, Squeezebox Touch, Acer Iconia Tab, and a Laptop WiFi. Never had any issue with reception/speed, even on the third level of my home.

Rope
 

Deerhunter

Well-Known Member
Cool it still all sounds like Greek to me but at lest I will know what I am looking for.

BTW how do I know what Blu-ray player is? I not seen that spec on any unless I am looking at the wrong things.
 

Rope

Well-Known Member
Famous
Deerhunter said:
Cool it still all sounds like Greek to me but at lest I will know what I am looking for.

BTW how do I know what Blu-ray player is? I not seen that spec on any unless I am looking at the wrong things.
If the BD player is of late, there's no question, it will be "N" series compatable.

Rope
 

Towen7

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
and it really doesn't matter...

If your router is N and the player is G... it will work at G speed.
If your router is G and the player is N... it will work at G speed.
If your router is N and the player is N... it will work at N speed.

Assuming you have decent signal strength at the player location, and don't have bunch of other wireless devices connected to your network, there should be no significant difference between N and G speed.
 

PaulyT

Behind the Curtain
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Superstar
Most of the players I've seen are G... are there really N ones out there? Well, as T7 says, just get an N router and you're safe in any case.
 
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