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What are you reading now?

Huey

Well-Known Member
Famous
What I find interesting about life, is that there is only one breed of human on this planet. And maybe breed isn't the right word, but take dogs for example. If dogs were like us, there might be only labradors. Sure there would still be different types of labs, there just wouldn't be any mastiffs, beagles, etc. We were taught growing up that homo sapiens and neanderthals didn't occupy the earth at the same time, but now we know that's not true, and that there was inter breeding between them. Why did neanderthals, denisovans and maybe others, die out, yet we survived?
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
What I find interesting about life, is that there is only one breed of human on this planet. And maybe breed isn't the right word, but take dogs for example. If dogs were like us, there might be only labradors. Sure there would still be different types of labs, there just wouldn't be any mastiffs, beagles, etc. We were taught growing up that homo sapiens and neanderthals didn't occupy the earth at the same time, but now we know that's not true, and that there was inter breeding between them. Why did neanderthals, denisovans and maybe others, die out, yet we survived?
We had larger brains.
 

hawk52

Well-Known Member
I'm a fan of these fantasy stories. This is the 1st in a trilogy of the KingKiller Trilogy. Enjoying every page.

The Name of the Wind (Kingkiller Chronicle Series #1) by Patrick Rothfuss


I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep.
You may have heard of me.


So begins the tale of Kvothe-from his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, to years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-riddled city, to his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a difficult and dangerous school of magic. In these pages you will come to know Kvothe as a notorious magician, an accomplished thief, a masterful musician, and an infamous assassin. But The Name Of The Wind is so much more-for the story it tells reveals the truth behind Kvothe's legend.



About the Author

Patrick Rothfuss currently lives in central Wisconsin where he teaches at the local university. Patrick loves words, laughs often, and dabbles in alchemy. His first novel, The Name of the Wind, was a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year. Its sequel, The Wise Man’s Fear, debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestseller chart and won the David Gemmell Legend Award. His novels have appeared on NPR’s Top 100 Science Fiction/Fantasy Books list and Locus’ Best 21st Century Fantasy Novels list. He can be found at patrickrothfuss.com and on Twitter at @patrickrothfuss.
 
D

Deleted member 133

Guest
What I find interesting about life, is that there is only one breed of human on this planet. And maybe breed isn't the right word, but take dogs for example. If dogs were like us, there might be only labradors. Sure there would still be different types of labs, there just wouldn't be any mastiffs, beagles, etc. We were taught growing up that homo sapiens and neanderthals didn't occupy the earth at the same time, but now we know that's not true, and that there was inter breeding between them. Why did neanderthals, denisovans and maybe others, die out, yet we survived?
Good questions!

Mike's response is somewhat correct: it is (possibly) related to our brains. I say somewhat because a certain theory says that it was indeed differences in our brains that led to Homo Sapiens effectively out-thinking Neanderthals. The sizes were similar but we each processed information differently. Take a look at this 5 year old article https://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/jun/02/why-did-neanderthals-die-out about half way down it talks about how Neanderthals larger eyes (as well as bodies) required more brain image processing / motor control, whereas Homo Sapiens evolved larger frontal lobes, which are associated with high-level processing. This then leads to the opportunity for us to out-think our competitors. Perhaps additional research has been published since then (and perhaps it will be covered in the last book I referenced in my previous post).

All fascinating stuff!

Jeff
 

Huey

Well-Known Member
Famous
The article points out a few things that I think may have changed in the last few years, mainly that Neanderthals didn't die out as long ago as once thought. Plus, they now know there was interbreeding between Homo Sapiens and Neanderthals. And to say that they didn't have the brain power to have social interactions, due to having stronger vision and body control, that's not the way it usually works in nature. Animals with the best vision tend to either be the best hunters or the best evaders, so you would think those with poorer eyesight, aka us, would have the disadvantage. Now we probably had a higher IQ, and better cognitive reasoning, which may have allowed to us to thrive.

Not trying to pick apart the link you posted Jeff, and he for sure has a far more extensive knowledge than I have on the subject, but I always enjoy discussing stuff like this, especially when we will probably never know the answer. I just have trouble wrapping my head around the fact that there is only one species of man, while I can't think of any other animal that doesn't have many species to their genus.

Which brings up another point, although this one more hypothetical than fact. If and when aliens do visit us, will they have just one type of being as we do, or will there be many different sub species of the same species, akin to a lab and a chihuahua.
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
The article points out a few things that I think may have changed in the last few years, mainly that Neanderthals didn't die out as long ago as once thought. Plus, they now know there was interbreeding between Homo Sapiens and Neanderthals. And to say that they didn't have the brain power to have social interactions, due to having stronger vision and body control, that's not the way it usually works in nature. Animals with the best vision tend to either be the best hunters or the best evaders, so you would think those with poorer eyesight, aka us, would have the disadvantage. Now we probably had a higher IQ, and better cognitive reasoning, which may have allowed to us to thrive.

Not trying to pick apart the link you posted Jeff, and he for sure has a far more extensive knowledge than I have on the subject, but I always enjoy discussing stuff like this, especially when we will probably never know the answer. I just have trouble wrapping my head around the fact that there is only one species of man, while I can't think of any other animal that doesn't have many species to their genus.

Which brings up another point, although this one more hypothetical than fact. If and when aliens do visit us, will they have just one type of being as we do, or will there be many different sub species of the same species, akin to a lab and a chihuahua.
Who says aliens haven't already visited us? The Truth is out there!! Trust no one.



I've been watching X-Files lately on FX channel
 

mcad64

Well-Known Member
It took me awhile, as I had to wait for the books to become available from my local library but I finally finished the entire Jack Reacher series. I have moved on and have adopted a new strategy.
I am going to read , concurrently the Harry Bosch series by Michael Connelly



.and the Mitch Rapp series by Vince Flynn



I think this will give a good balance as one is a 40 year old ex Vietnam vet turned detective and the other is a 23 year old spy. Read the first of the series from each author and enjoyed them both!!
 

Flint

"Do you know who I am?"
Superstar
Based on a review in the WSJ and my love for well-researched historical fiction novels, I started reading Golden Hill by Francis Sputtford. It is a tough read, as the story is a little intense with lots of open-ended questions about all of the characters (basically, characters are introduced and their role, position, title, history, connections, etc. are slowly revealed. It makes for taking the story completely at face value as you don't really know the characters all that well initially) and the use of grammar, spellings, and even languages common in NYC in 1715. Sometimes I have to re-read whole paragraphs because the language is so deeply a mix of Dutch, Middle English, French, and Irish. For instance, I wasn't sure about the description of a drawing room scene because the author kept speaking of one character's presence on the "suffa" which confused me, because at first I assumed I could continue reading and the from the context I could figure out the meaning of the word, but that never happened. So, I re-read the paragraph and assumed it was an old use of "sofa" which might be the modern version of "suffa". Well, it kinda worked, but it was completely obvious. I eventually flipped out phone and looked up "suffa" and sure enough, it was the old Turkish word for sofa and what they called what we now call a sofa (and what separates a sofa from a couch, even though we use those term interchangeably these days). I find that both fun as the challenge is fun and learning something new is refreshing.

But, as I get past the initial struggles, I find it completely engaging and entertaining. I am about 1/4 of the way in and I still have no idea why the protagonist travelled to NYC from London or who it really is, and that is one question everyone he encounters and befriends in NYC want to know as he could be friend or he could be foe.

 
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mzpro5

Well-Known Member
Famous
What I find interesting about life, is that there is only one breed of human on this planet. And maybe breed isn't the right word, but take dogs for example. If dogs were like us, there might be only labradors. Sure there would still be different types of labs, there just wouldn't be any mastiffs, beagles, etc. We were taught growing up that homo sapiens and neanderthals didn't occupy the earth at the same time, but now we know that's not true, and that there was inter breeding between them. Why did neanderthals, denisovans and maybe others, die out, yet we survived?
A long time ago there was a canine (wolf, early dog whatever you want to call it) There was only really one breed. The multitude of breeds today in dogs is a result of manipulation of the canine species by humans through selective breeding. Though some have tried it hasn't been done with humans so far.
 

Huey

Well-Known Member
Famous
A long time ago there was a canine (wolf, early dog whatever you want to call it) There was only really one breed. The multitude of breeds today in dogs is a result of manipulation of the canine species by humans through selective breeding. Though some have tried it hasn't been done with humans so far.
While I don't disagree that humans have bred dogs for their own purposes, I would disagree that the reason we have so many breeds is because of us, although obviously some of them are. My point is that with any animal, we have many different breeds, like a black squirrel versus a gray squirrel, or a carp versus a bluegill, etc, but we only have one breed of man.
 

walls

Well-Known Member
Don't know if anyone else here is into comics but I just started volume 5 of this, it's absolutely fantastic! Kirkmans writing on this is the best he's done since the early Walking Dead days.
 

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